Info and Resources

A concussion is a brain injury. Take it seriously.
DO NOT IGNORE THESE SYMPTOMS

  • Confusion
  • Dizziness or balance problems
  • Headache
  • Sensitive to light or noise
  • Double or fuzzy vision
  • Nausea or vomiting
  • Difficulty paying attention & remembering

  • CONCUSSION FACTS

  • Most concussions do not involve loss of consciousness
  • Concussions will not show up on CAT scans, MRIs or X-rays
  • A concussion is invisible but the symptoms are not
  • Some symptoms are visible days or weeks after the injury
  • Multiple concussions can cause cumulative and long-lasting life changes

  • IF YOU SUSPECT A CONCUSSION

  • See a doctor
  • Physical rest
  • Cognitive rest
  • * Also keep a calendar of symptoms and report them to the doctor at follow-up visits.
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    concussion guidelines for athletes
     
    ARTICLE NOTES:
    Morrish, J., Kennedy, P. and Groff, P. (2011). Parental influence over teen risk-taking: A review of the literature. SMARTRISK: Toronto, ON Stattin, H., & Kerr, M. (2000). Parental Monitoring: A reinterpretation. Child Development, 71,1072-1085. Willoughby, T. & Hamza, C. (2011). A longitudinal examination of the bidirectional associations among perceived parenting behaviors, adolescent disclosure and problem behavior across the high school years. Journal of Youth and Adolescence, 40, 463-478.

    Morrongiello, B., Corbett, M. & Bellissimo, A. (2008). ‘Do as I say, not as I do?': Family influences on children’s safety and risk behaviours. Health Psychology, 27, 4, 498-503

    McCrory, P., Meeuwisse, W.H., Aubry, M. et al. (2013). Consensus statement on concussion in sport: the 4th international conference on concussion in sport held in Zurich, November 2012. British Journal of Sports Medicine, 47, 250-258.